RSS

Updates from our Partner Organizations

Women in Business – 17 – 18 March 2016
This two-day workshop addresses the issues of women in business.

Communication with Power and Impact for Women – 12 April 2016 Good leaders are good communicators. Come and find out more.

Fist Athena Award presented to Professor Dr Maria Grever in recognition of her contribution to promoting female talent. Professor Dr Maria Grever is the first recipient of this new award, which is intended for those who have made an exceptional contribution to promoting female talent and, as such, set an example for their colleagues. The Athena Award was set up by the Erasmus Network of Female Professors (ENVH).

Further details can be found at www.rsm.nl/executive-education/open-programmes/programmes/negotiating-for-women-the-key-to-career-success/overview/ or contact our programme adviser Rianne van Reeuwijk rreeuwijk@rsm.nl.

GLI’s new Leadership Quest App is now available.

For Global and Culturally Diverse Leaders and Leadership, edited by Jean Lau Chin, Joseph E. Trimble and Joseph E. Garcia:
How the Communal Philosophies of Ubuntu in Africa and Confucius Thought in China Might Enrich Western Notions of Leadership: Rob Elkington and Elizabeth Tuleja.

For Grassroots Leadership & The Arts For Social Change, edited by Susan Erenrich, and Jon Wergin:
The Notion of Ubuntu and Emergent Leadership as Expressed Through the Arts in Apartheid South Africa: Rob Elkington, Jennifer Moss and John Volmink.

GLI also offers online university-accredited leadership certificates at www.glieducation.com.

GLI’s book Visionary Leadership in a VUCA World due for release in June 2016. Managing Editor: Madeleine van der Steege.

http://www.afr.com/brand/boss/how-fons-trompenaars-persuaded-kpmg-to-embracing-the-paradox-of-servant-leadership-20160109-gm2guk

For more information contact Jill Sheen at UnitedSucces

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 17, 2016 in Business

 

Top tips for Hi-Po talent

Top tips for Hi-Po talent
Business woman is wearing black suit isolated on white

Business woman is wearing black suit isolated on white. Contains EPS10 and high-resolution JPEG

  • Step up to the plate
  • Show your team and manager what you’ve got: do the hard work and deliver results with your projects, showing your value to the team
  • Find ways to enhance your self-understanding and clarify what you want to achieve
  • Review your tasks, projects and loose ends weekly and re-organize yourself so you can focus strategically and know where you are going
  • Evaluate: even if no-one else is evaluating and giving you feedback, take the time to evaluate projects yourself
  • Take initiative
  • Let your manager and team know specifically how to guide you in achieving your growth goals
  • Communicate often with managers about your challenges, career goals, feedback and needs
  • Communicate often with managers to get to know their needs and expectations for projects, your role, etc.
  • If you don’t know what to do, take the first step to figure it out
  • Seek out mentors from inside or outside your organization and industry to provide you with valuable insights
  • Create networks of other young talent
  • Continue learning: on the job, from research, read books, look online… keep developing yourself

Intergenerational teamwork helps you gain more benefit from organisational diversity. If you want coaching or training in these areas, please e-mail me on mads@synquity.com view www.synquity.com or call me on +31 6308 85046.

www.synquity.com

Logo Synquity  Ver2

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 17, 2016 in Business

 

Best intergenerational tips for managers with Hi-Po teams

Best intergenerational tips for managers with Hi-Po teams

0456_nayami_biz_ningen_old copy

  • Create productive and innovative conditions for development
  • Provide stretching assignments that balance skill and challenge: if an assignment lacks challenge, it will move the employee towards boredom. However, if the assignment is too challenging without the necessary skill, it will create anxiety. If the balance is right, excitement and flow will develop
  • Give permission to make mistakes – most is learnt from failure, and failure can often stimulate deeper creativity
  • Focus on and role model what is important vs. only responding to urgent directives
  • Provide appreciation and feedback – acknowledge a job well done, give people a chance to speak without interruption, continue treating people with respect vs. “inferior”
  • Create mutual understanding of communication e.g.:
    • Regularly meeting to review during project lifetime vs. only at the end
    • Face-to-face feedback vs. written
    • Discuss and consult vs. “tell, announce”
    • Create clear mutual expectations
    • Discuss goals upfront
    • Provide role-description parameters (“You are leading/and responsible”) or you are facilitating and learning, but the Manager is responsible”)
    • Indicate expected standard of performance

Manage the intergenerational dynamics at the workplace, prevent disabling intergenerational conflict, improve intergenerational teamwork and gain more benefit from organisational diversity. If you want coaching or training in these areas, please e-mail me on mads@synquity.com view www.synquity.com or call me on +31 6308 85046.

www.synquity.com

Logo Synquity  Ver2

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 17, 2016 in Business

 

Are your leaders abusive?

Dollarphotoclub_74384777 copy

Are your leaders abusive? Ethical? Transformational?

Try out these free quizzes by the Queen’s School of Business and get feedback here: https://dev.qsblearning.ca/OUP/TheScienceOfLeadership/Questionnaire

www.synquity.com
If you want management coaching or training please e-mail me on mads@synquity.com view www.synquity.com or call me on +31 6308 85046.

Logo Synquity  Ver2

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 17, 2016 in Business

 

Mistakes to avoid in intergenerational conflict 

Dollarphotoclub_72457115 copy

  • Poor match between a manager and Hi-Po (high potential talent) team
  • Not alerting mixed-generational team of the possibility of upfront, unconscious biases and expectations
  • Allowing misperceptions to stockpile and reinforcing negative generational stereotypes
  • Exercising poor team practices (not clarifying goals or expectations upfront, absence of a forum for open communication, creating unsafe environment where people can’t learn from mistakes)
  • Incongruent and poor self leadership behaviour by manager (taking things personally and becoming insulting and attacking, publicly dumping negative perceptions about the team, becoming vengeful)
  • Reactive institutional support after problem arises (HR arbitrating communication and role expectations)
  • Absence of proactive mandate for good team practices, failure to train Hi-Po mentors and provide all-round education on good intergenerational dynamics and conflict-resolution mechanisms.

Preparing managers who are appointed to mentor a Hi-Po team, reduces the possibility of destructive intergenerational conflict that can stunt productive teamwork. To gain more benefit from organisational diversity, you can improve your Diversity IQ with our coaching or training in these areas. E-mail me on mads@synquity.com view www.synquity.com or call me on +31 6308 85046.

Logo Synquity  Ver2

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 17, 2016 in Business

 
Link

9f5b44e8-22ec-4b95-b58a-26f01b4d0e5c

Reference: The Divergent Generation: Will you be left factionless? Paper presented by Barron, Dykes, Gilbert, Lemaster and Whyte, ILA Conference, Barcelona, 2015

Intergenerational dynamics at the workplace and intergenerational conflict is common and can impact negatively on teamwork. To gain the benefit from organisational diversity, get coaching or training in Diversity IQ email me on mads@synquity.com and view www.synquity.com or call me on +31 6308 85046.

www.synquity.com

Logo Synquity  Ver2

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 17, 2016 in Business

 

How intergenerational team conflict can escalate 

How intergenerational team conflict can escalate 

Based on a true story: Petra is a 55-year-old project manager in the bio-science industry in the Netherlands. After a colleague fell ill, she was asked to ‘adopt’ a team of high potentials (Hi-Po’s) who were young, bright and enthusiastic and had been hand-picked by HR with the aim of nurturing their talents. Here is what happened:

Petra’s perspective
Soon after her first interaction with this group Petra started to have doubts about the team’s potential as she expected much more from these “bright sparks”. She grew increasingly unhappy with the team and made a point of communicating her disappointment with them to anyone and everyone who would listen.
“They don’t seem that smart. The output of their work is substandard. They’re continually late for meetings and have absolutely no respect for my authority. In my day, all we needed was a kick …… These youngsters need to grow up and take life more seriously.”
Petra felt she was very open and approachable. She felt that she was continually making concessions to meet them and to accommodate their specific needs.
She thought “They have an attitude problem and need to be toned down a few notches”.

The Hi-Po team’s perspective
The team’s motivation started to decline. They became more and more disengaged from their projects and felt that work was becoming unbearable. “The woman is like an army sergeant”.   Before a site visit Petra e-mailed the team a list of rules on how to ‘behave’. This made them feel they were being treated like children!

“She never gives clear feedback and she makes the team set ridiculous deadlines that even she cannot meet. She is continually complaining about punctuality, but she is not setting an example either. As a group, we’ve tried to talk to her about the situation numerous times, but she is unwilling to enter any form of dialogue”.  “She is inconsistent. In a recent project review, one of the team members got a terrible rating, even though she had pulled the project through. When she was discussing this with her, she suddenly changed her mind and gave her a better rating. She seems to have her favourites and rates them better than the rest of the team, even if they are not performing as well.”

The young talented team lodged a formal complaint against the manager.  Things escalated when HR was asked to step in.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 17, 2016 in Business

 
 
%d bloggers like this: